Mobility / Posture: Muscle, Joint and Skeletal System – Elite Tips

  • Flexibility/Mobility Exercises
    • Self Myofascial release
    • Neuromuscular activation exercises
    • Dynamic mobility exercises (move back and forth for each exercise)
    • Russian Baby Maker (static stretch)
    • Knee to chest walk
    • Knee out table walk
    • Lunge, opposite hand down, straight back leg, hand up opening towards bent leg, sink hips for stretch
    • Foot straight, push knee towards wall, all 3 directions
    • Glute bridges up and down
    • X band side step
    • One leg standing hamstring stretch
    • Lunges with putting arms up on way down
    • Bridge position, shoulder up and down
    • Stand against wall with forearms vertical to floor, and bring arms up and down pushing back against wall
    • Side squats
    • Air Squats
    • Static stretching coupled with stability
    • One leg glute bridge pulling other knee for hip stretch.
    • A Short and Sweet Guide to Opening Tight Hip Flexors: https://www.gymnasticbodies.com/short-sweet-guide-opening-tight-hip-flexors/?inf_contact_key=af7f3112b16e3d0df5b1e23e53f7712851b6df4c6cb194e6cac0df1e03626c8f
  • Postural Correctness / Physical Imbalance Correction
    • Alexander Technique
    • Injury Proof
      • Weighted shoulder dislocates (targets all 9 shoulder muscles).
      • Good exercises for common muscle imbalances
        • Seated scapular row.
        • Externally rotate shoulders with band.
        • Front plank
        • Clam shells / fire hydrant
    • The FMS is a series of seven movement tests administered by a certified professional. Each test is scored on a three-point scale. For self-assessment, his professional FMS can be abbreviated to five movements with simple pass-fail evaluation:
      • 1. Deep squat
      • 2. Hurdle step
      • 3. In-line lunge
      • 4. Active straight leg raise
      • 5. Seated rotation. This self-FMS is designed to identify two things: left-right imbalances (asymmetry) and motor control issues (wobbling and shifting).
    • Hamstring tightness imbalance
      • Keeping your feet together and knees locked, attempt to touch your toes with both feet on the ground. If that’s too easy, attempt to touch the heel of your palms to your toes. Now test the same stretch again on each side independently. Place one foot on a step or block, and remember to keep your knees fully locked to prevent cheating. Perform on both sides. On the left: Step 1. One the right: Step 2.
    • Critical four corrective exercises:
      • Chop and lift (C&L)
      • Turkish get-up (TGU)
      • Two-arm single-leg deadlift (2SDL)
      • Cross-body one-arm single-leg deadlift (1SDL)
    • EXERCISE #1—CHOP AND LIFT (C&L)
      • 1. Chopping is a downward diagonal movement across the body from a high position to a low position, and lifting is the upward diagonal movement from a low position to a high position. They are essentially mirror images of one another. The start and finish positions of the chop. The start and finish positions of the lift. The block under the knee, which I did not use, is optional and used here to achieve a more acute upward angle.
      • 2. You will always chop to the down knee and lift toward the upward knee.Both the front foot and down knee should ideally be placed in a straight line, and tape on the ground (or any line) can be used to ensure this is the case. Ideal placement on one line
      • 3. Stick with a “bar” for the first month or two. Both the half-kneeling chop and the half-kneeling lift will be performed on cables using either an attachable bar or, as in our photographs, the more common “tricep extension” attachment with the rope fully slid to one side to imitate a bar.
      • 4. Unload between repetitions if possible (rest the weight stack). Reengaging is where the money is, and where you stimulate more neurons.”
      • 5. Do your best to breathe as follows and keep your face relaxed: a. Inhale a large amount of air at the start of the movement and pressurize your abdomen by tightening all the muscles in your hips and torso.
      • 6. Head and shoulder rotation: The head should not rotate independently of the shoulders. If we imagine the hips and shoulders square with each other in the starting position, you shouldn’t rotate the shoulders more than 15–20 degrees off the hips. More rotation will not get more activation out of the abs, and it could force you to lose the proper lower back and “tall spine” position.
      • 7. It should be a mild struggle. You want to do a complete “rep-out” within 6–12 repetitions, so that you test to the point of loss of appropriate posture and/or smooth movement, or to the point where a struggle is demonstrated that compromises technique. Thus, you’re lifting to “failure” of posture or technique, not muscular failure.
    • 2. Performing the One-Arm Single-Leg Deadlift
      • 1. Stand on one foot, with about a 20-degree knee bend, and with the dumbbell or kettlebell placed to the inside of the supporting foot (elevated if needed to accomodate flexibility). The other leg is in full extension behind the body and is not allowed to be externally or internally rotated. In other words, the toe of the rear leg should point toward the ground at all times. External rotation of the leg will allow the hip to open up and throw off the mechanics.
      • 2. Hinging at the hip, mimic a sitting movement and push your buttocks backward. Reach down and grab the weight with the arm opposite the standing leg. Use the free arm to balance. Imagine lifting the weight in a see-saw-like motion.6 A significant amount of rotational torque is generated when you stand on one leg and pull a weight with the opposite arm. Preventing this rotation requires core stability, which is exactly what we’re trying to develop.
      • 3. Set the weight down between each repetition. Gray works with high-profile athletes, and his deadlifting injury rate is zero. This rule (sets of one) is why.
      • 4. If you are aiming for a set of five repetitions, for example, what you’re really performing is nine repetitions, five loaded and four unloaded interspersed between them. Here’s what it looks like: Reach down, deadlift the weight up to standing, set it back down under control, stand back up without the weight, regain your composure and posture, clear a breath, then go back down and repeat. Learn to hinge the hip and push into the floor with your foot before regrabbing—setting up the rep is as important as the rep itself. Just as with the chop and lift, going from unloaded to loaded is the whole point.
  • Miscellaneous
    • Do side to side and knee in different planes out and in of toe to develop acl and joints that don’t get developed from standard squat, etc.
    • Hanging on a bar with your hands is great for your shoulders. Do frequently.
    • Some mobility and flexibility work takes 6 months at least before improvement
    • Put a pillow down and sit in leg up hip stretch while working/sitting otherwise.
    • Compression socks to help blood flow when sitting for extending periods of time (e.g. flights and meetings).
    • Good shoes: Altra shoes for level/non-raised heel, enough toe space, and enough cushion to protect against hard surface walking.
    • Finish each stretch with a contraction of the muscle else risk injury.
    • Foam rolling is bad and increases scar tissue according to Charles Poliquin. Kettle bell swings are damaging to your discs and goblet squats don’t overload your legs.
    • Grasten: 6 metal prong fascia and scar tissue breakdown.

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